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Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the Brain

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Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain is one of the most promising and rapidly improving methods of modern neuroradiology.

With magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, the doctor gets the opportunity to investigate the structural and pathological changes in the patient's brain tissue, to appreciate the physicochemical, pathophysiological processes of the entire brain as a whole or its individual structures, to conduct functional studies of the brain based on changes in local activity.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain is safe for the patient since it does not have radiation effects on the body during this diagnostic procedure.

Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain also allows performing magnetic resonance angiography of the vessels of the brain, which does not require direct puncture of the artery that supplies the brain.

3D amplified MRI aMRI.

Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain allows you to obtain a series of thin sections, build a three-dimensional reconstruction of the area under study, highlight the vasculature, and even individual nerve trunks passing through the subarachnoid space of the brain.

Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in the frontal plane is prescribed for some of its diseases.

Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain allows you to assess the volume and position of the ventricular system of the brain. On magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, cisterns of the base of the skull and other spaces containing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are also well visualized.

A – empty sella turcica. Sagittal postcontrast T1-weighted image. The yellow arrowhead illustrates an expanded cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)–filled empty-appearing sella turcica. The white arrowhead illustrates a flattened appearance of the pituitary gland against the floor of the sella turcica.
B – cerebellar tonsillar ectopia. Sagittal postcontrast T1-weighted image. The arrowhead illustrates the low-lying position but normal rounded morphology of the cerebellar tonsils 5 mm below the foramen magnum (white line).
C – enlarged Meckel caves. Coronal T2-weighted image. Arrowheads show abnormally enlarged CSF-filled Meckel caves bilaterally.
D – meningoencephalocele. Coronal T2-weighted image through the right temporal lobe. Yellow arrowheads illustrate margins of defects in the tegmen mastoideum transmitting CSF and a portion of the right inferior temporal lobe (white arrowhead). Fluid within adjacent mastoid air cells indicates an associated CSF leak.
E – posterior scleral flattening and increased optic nerve tortuosity. Oblique sagittal reconstruction of volumetric T2-weighted image in the plane of the optic nerve (ON) illustrates posterior scleral flattening (white arrowhead) and increased vertical tortuosity of the intraorbital ON sheath complex (yellow arrowhead).
F – optic nerve head protrusion and increased perioptic nerve CSF. Axial T2-weighted image illustrates protrusion of the prelaminar optic nerves (yellow arrowheads), indicating severe papilledema and distension of the optic nerve sheaths by CSF (white arrowheads) bilaterally.
G - optic nerve head enhancement. Axial postcontrast T1-weighted image illustrating enhancement of the prelaminar optic nerves bilaterally (arrowheads), indicating optic disc edema.
H - transverse venous sinus stenosis. Cranio-caudal maximum intensity projection of a postcontrast magnetic resonance venogram. Arrowheads illustrate smooth tapered severe stenosis of the distal transverse sinuses bilaterally.

Such a three-dimensional reconstruction of brain tissue with magnetic resonance imaging provides invaluable assistance to a neurosurgeon in planning an operation and for subsequent postoperative control.

Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in the sagittal plane is prescribed for some of its diseases. Showing sections of the third and fourth ventricles of the brain.

Early diagnosis with the use of magnetic resonance imaging of the brain allows timely treatment of the patient's disease.

The ability using magnetic resonance imaging to simultaneously demonstrate the spinal cord and spine along the cervical spine without the introduction of contrast agents into the spinal cord spaces and without the use of ionizing radiation (X-ray), to determine the localization and size of tumors, the state of the intervertebral discs of the cervical spine, intervertebral joints, vertebral bodies.

Currently, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain has come to the fore in the diagnosis of most diseases of the brain and its vessels, pushing aside such invasive methods as myelography, and giving the patient's ionizing radiation, such as computed tomography (CT).

Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in the axial plane is prescribed for some of its diseases.

In what cases can a magnetic resonance imaging of the brain be prescribed:

Diagnostic procedure for magnetic resonance imaging of the brain.

Our patients are offered to undergo an MRI scan of the brain using an apparatus with a magnetic field of 3.0 T (Tesla). It is also possible to conduct MRI with intravenous contrast (Omniscan contrast) to increase the visual difference between healthy tissue and tumor. Weight restriction (for a patient with a large weight) during magnetic resonance imaging - up to 200 kg.